Bulk Stowage Factors

BULK CARGO STOWAGE FACTORS

  • Aluminum Bauxite – 26/28
  • Amblygonite Ore – 29/31
  • Antimony Stibnite – 14/16
  • Asbestos Ore – 69/71
  • Asphalt – 30/35 (Native asphalt is a mineral resin formed by the natural drying of rocks. Tar/bitumen product. Same characteristics as pitch, which see)
  • Ball Clay (Also known as china clay) – 38/40 to deteriorate into a slimy mess and cannot be trimmed)
  • Barley – 54/60
  • Brazil Nuts – 82/85
  • Brimstone (See sulphur)
  • BuckWheat – 63/65
  • Cement – 21/23
  • Chalk – 36/40 (Familiar form of limestone)
  • China Clay (Kaolin) – 38/40 (The clay is shipped in the form of china clay, china stone or ball clay. See above)
  • Clay (Bentonite) – 36/40
  • Chrome Ore – 12/14
  • Coal – American 42/46, n.s.w. 44/48, Wales 43/44, Scotland 45/48
  • Cobalt – 18/20
  • Coconut – 95/100
  • Coke – 70/102 (Coke stowage factors vary widely, Depending on loading country)
  • Copper – 14/20
  • Copper Concentrates – 14/18
  • Copper Matte – 25/29 (A crude black copper ore)
  • Copper Pyrites (Yellow Sulphur) – 20/23 (A mineral sulphide from which about 10% copper is obtained)
  • Copra – 70/75 (A dried kernel of the coconut with an oil content as high as 66%)
  • Copra Expeller Pellets – 60/65
  • Corn (Maize) – 49/53
  • Corundum Ore – 22/24 (An oxide of aluminum, being next to the hardest
  • Cotton Seeds – 80/90 (Shipped from all cotton growing countries, stow factors can be as low as 64 and as high as 100)
  • Cotton Seed Cake – 49/51 (Requires good ventilation. The cake is very prone to infection of the rut-red beetle)
  • Cubic Nitrate (Nitrate of soda, saltpeter) -33/35 (A deposit of sodium nitrate in the soils of chile and peru used as a natural fertilizer).
  • Diamonium Phosphate (Dap) – 38/39 (Mineral Fertilizer. Absorbs moisture readily. Do not expose to rain or moisture. Very dusty)
  • Flaxseed – 59/61 (Seed of flax plant, generally known as linseed from which linseed oil is extracted)
  • Fluorspar – 22/24 (Coarse dust with upto 2 inch lumps)
  • Kernel – 60/65 (This nut is very liable to heat, sweat and deterioration constant ventilation is a must)
  • Guano (Fishmeal) – 39/41 – (Fossilized dung of seabirds, mainly collected from wcsa, islands off wcsa and pacific islands)
  • Gypsum (Moonstone, Selenite) – 38 (Soft mineral. Common form of alabaster. Moonstone and selenite are transparent)
  • Hematite (iron ore) – 11/14 (The red oxide ore is the most important ore. It contains 70% metal. The brown variety hematite contains about 60% metal)
  • Hemp Seed – 57/59
  • Ilmenite Sand – 12/13 (Ilmenite is a very heavy sand, almost black in color. Titanium extracted from ilmenite is the whitest pigment known yet)
  • Iron Ore (Hematite) – 11/14 (Stow factors vary with load country)
  • Iron Pyrites – 20/30 (Stow varies depending on mineral content. Also known as sulphide of iron or sulphide of copper = ‘copper pyrites’, used in the production of sulphuric acid)
  • Kyanite Ore – 18/22 (Kyanite must be kept completely dry as it solidifies if wet)
  • Lead Concentrates – 12/14
  • Locust Beans – 87/90 (Flour obtained from the beans is made into various classes of foodstuff for humans and into minerals)
  • Magnesite, Deadburned – 24/26 (Used in the manufacture of refractory bricks. Very dusty but not oderous. Liable to shift when wet.)
  • Manganese Ore – 17/18 (Two kinds of ore exist, black oxide and red oxide)
  • Magnetite – 15/17 (Iron ore containing about 62/63% metal, high moisture content)
  • Maize (Corn) – 49/53
  • Milo – 49/51
  • Oats, Unclipped – 89/91
  • Oats, Clipped – 68/70
  • Pellets – 59/61 (Good ventilations is essential. Often infected with the kaprha beetle. Charterers are usually asked to pay for fumigation after discharge)
  • Phosphate – 35/37
  • Pig Iron - 10/12
  • Pitch – 30/35 (See asphalt)
  • Rapeseed – 43/48
  • Rice – 44/69 (Stow varies widely depending on country of origin)
  • Rye – 50/51 (Requires the most careful trimming of any grains)
  • Salt – 36/38 (On long voyages, due to evaporation the loss of weight is 5% or more. Not to be stowed in insulated compartments)
  • Sand – 18/19 (Silver sand for glass making. Bilges and wells should be well protected against sand)
  • Scrap Iron – 25/30 (Also known as metal borings, cuttings and turnings. Frequently covered with oil, therefore potentially liable to spontaneous combustion) 
  • Slag (basic) – 30/32 (Fused waste obtained during smelting of iron ore which, because of its high phosphoric acid content is used as fertilizer)
  • Soda Ash – 40/43 (Or sodium carbonate, extensively used in the manufacture of glass and soap, also for bleaching and washing)
  • Sorghum – 47/49
  • Soybeans – 44/48
  • Soybean Meal – 63/65
  • Soybean Cake – 65/70 (Cake is made from the residue of the bean of that name after the oil from which it is extracted)
  • Sugar – 45/48 (Stow factor depends on country of loading)
  • Sulphur (Brimstone) – 30/31
  • Sunflower Seeds – 88/90
  • Sunflower Seed Cake – 58/60 (Liable to spontaneous combustion)
  • Superphosphate – 36/38 (Fertilizer composed of phosphate with sulphuric acid)
  • Triple Super Phosphate (tsp) – 36/37
  • Tripolite – 74/76 (Siliciferous and porous rock)
  • Umber Ore – 40/42 (A dark brown ore used as a pigment)
  • Urea – 49/50
  • Vanadium Ore – 22/24
  • Wheat – 46/48
  • Whitherite Ore – 18/20
  • Woodchips Softwood – 103/106
  • Hardwood – 81/83 (Common sawdust varying in density according to cut and type of timber. Since frequently left in the open for some time before cargo it is loaded, it is liable to have substantial moisture content).
  • Zinc Blende – 20/24
  • Zinc Concentrates – 18/21
  • Zirconium Ore – 17/19 (Used in the manufacturing of certain steels)
  • Zircon Sand – 23/26 (Used in the hardening of steel)